Vitamin supplements guide   Vitamins & health supplements guide

 
Threonine quick review
Description: a hydroxyl-containing amino acid, also an essential amino acid, an important part of many proteins in the body.
Health benefits: necessary for the formation of tooth enamel and elastin and collagen which are needed for both healthy skin and wound healing.

Sources & dosage: meats and fish, dairy foods, eggs, wheatgerm, bananas, carrots, nuts, beans and seeds.
 
MaxAmino 1200 by Vitabase
Max Amino 1200 is a concentrated source of amino acids for use during periods of intense physical activity or stress. It contains a blend of free-form and di- and tri-peptide amino acids. This highest-grade enzymatic digest of Lactalbumin provides both essential and branched-chain amino acids and is formulated with supplemental amounts of L-Ornithine, L-Carnitine and L-Lysine as well as the metabolic cofactor, Vitamin B-6. Click here for more information.
 

Threonine


Threonine is one of the 20 most common natural amino acids. Threonine is another hydroxyl-containing amino acid. It differs from serine by having a methyl substituent in place of one of the hydrogens on the β carbon and it differs from valine by replacement of a methyl substituent with a hydroxyl group. The hydroxyl group is fairly reactive, being able to form hydrogen bonds with a variety of polar substrates. Threonine is an important component in the formation of protein, collagen, elastin and tooth enamel. It is also important for production of neurotransmitters and health of the nervous system. Nutritionally, in humans, threonine is also an essential amino acid. Human beings cannot synthesize it from simpler metabolites. Threonine is must be obtained through the diet.

 

Threonine functions, uses, and health benefits


Threonine is an important part of many proteins in the body and is necessary for the formation of tooth enamel and elastin and collagen which are needed for both healthy skin and wound healing. Threonine has a mild glucose-sparing effect and is useful in the stabilization of blood sugar because it can be converted into glucose in the liver by the process of gluconeogenesis. Threonine is one of the immune-stimulating nutrients (cysteine, lysine, alanine, and aspartic acid are others), as it promotes thymus growth and activity. Threonine may enhance immunity by assisting in the production of agents that fight viral infections. It also can probably promote cell immune defense function. Threonine is important in the formation of collagen and elastin. When combined with aspartic acid, methionine aids liver and lipotropic function. Threonine is used to treat indigestion and intestinal malfunctions. Threonine may prevent fat from accumulating in the liver. A fatty liver can affect liver function and is associated with diseases of the liver such as cirrhosis. Threonine is an immunostimulant which promotes the growth of thymus gland.
 

Dietary sources of threonine


Threonine is found in most meats and fish, dairy foods, eggs, wheatgerm, bananas, carrots, nuts, beans and seeds. Rich sources of threonine include meats, dairy foods and eggs. Wheat germ, many nuts, beans, and seeds, and vegetables contains some small level of threonine.