Vitamin supplements guide   Vitamins & health supplements guide

 
Iodine quick review
Biological functions: essential for thyroid heakth and for the production of thyroid hormones that regulate the metabolic energy of the body and set the basal metabolic rate.
Health benefits: an essential component of thyroid hormones, which are required for normal development and metabolism. Thyroid hormones affect heart rate, blood pressure, body temperature, and weight.
Deficiency symptoms: hypothyroidism, lethargy, weight gain, stillbirths, abortions and congenital abnormalities, and mental retardation.

Sources & dosage: iodized salt, shellfish, white deep-water fish, and brown seaweed kelp; adults need about 150 mcg per day.

Side efffects: excessive iodine intake may be associated with an increased incidence of thyroid papillary cancer.
 
Ultra Minerals by Vitabase
Minerals are divided into two classes: macrominerals and trace minerals. Macrominerals are needed in larger amounts than trace minerals. Ultra Minerals by Vitabase includes the macrominerals calcium, magnesium and potassium. Important trace minerals in our supplement are iron, iodine, zinc, selenium, copper, manganese, chromium, molybdenum, vanadium and boron. Many of the minerals are chelated which means they have been bonded to a protein molecule. This helps transport them to the blood stream and enhances absorption at the cellular level. Click here for more information.
 

Iodine supplements


Iodine is a trace mineral produced by the body that is essential for normal growth and development. Iodine constitutes about 0.00004% of the total human body weight. Approximately 60% of the total body pool of iodine is stored in the thyroid gland. The remainder is found in the blood, ovary, and muscle. Adequate levels of iodine in the body are essential for thyroid heakth and for the production of thyroid hormones that regulate the metabolic energy of the body and set the basal metabolic rate. Saltwater fish, shellfish, sea vegetables (seaweed) and iodized salt are good source of iodine.

 

Biological functions and health benefits of iodine


Humans require iodine for proper physical and mental development. Iodine is an essential component of thyroid hormones, which are required for normal development and metabolism. The thyroid gland makes T3 (triiodothyronine) and T4 (thyroxine), which together are considered thyroid hormone. T3 and T4 have identical effects on cells. Thyroid hormones affect heart rate, blood pressure, body temperature, and weight. They act on the body to increase the basal metabolic rate, affect protein synthesis and increase the body's sensitivity to catecholamines (such as adrenaline). The thyroid hormones are essential to proper development and differentiation of all cells of human body. To various extents they regulate protein, fat and carbohydrate metabolism. But they have their most pronounced effects on how human cells use energetic compounds. To meet the body's demand for thyroid hormones, the thyroid gland traps iodine from the blood and converts it into thyroid hormones that are stored and released into the circulation when needed.
 

Iodine deficiency


Signs of iodine deficiency include hypothyroidism, lethargy, and weight gain. The clinical presentation of iodine deficiency is goiter. Iodine deficiency is the primary cause of simple goiter and has been linked conclusively to cretinism. Serious iodine deficiency during pregnancy may result in stillbirths, abortions and congenital abnormalities. Iodine deficiency is the leading cause of mental retardation, producing typical reductions in IQ of 10 to 15 IQ points. It has been speculated that deficiency of iodine and other micronutrients and may be a possible factor in observed differences in IQ between ethnic groups.
 

Dietary sources of iodine


Iodized salt is the primary dietary source of iodine. Plant and animal sea life, such as shellfish, white deep-water fish, and brown seaweed kelp, absorb iodine from the water and are great sources of iodine. Some seafood and sea vegetables are rich iodine. They include canned sardines, canned tuna, clams, cod, haddock, halibut, herring, lobster, oyster, perch, salmon, sea bass, and shrimp. Dulse, kelp, and seaweed are also sources of dietary iodine. Garlic, lima beans, sesame seeds, soybeans, spinach, Swiss chard, summer squash, and turnip greens are also good sources of this mineral. Bakeries may also add iodine to dough as a stabilizing agent, making bread another source of iodine.

 

Dosage, intake, recommended daily allowance (RDA)


Adults need about 150 mcg per day. Pregnant females needs 220 mcg per day. Infants birth to 6 months make 110 mcg perday. Since the introduction of iodized salt, iodine supplements are unnecessary and not recommended for most people.

 

Side effects, precautions, toxicity, and drug interactions


Daily intake of 2,000 mcg iodine may be toxic, particularly in people with kidney disease or tuberculosis. Excessive iodine intake may be associated with an increased incidence of thyroid papillary cancer. Pregnant women and nursing mothers should avoid intakes of iodine (iodide) greater than RDA amounts. Direct contact with skin can cause lesions so care needs to be taken in handling iodine. Iodine vapor is very irritating to eyes and mucous membranes.