Vitamin supplements guide   Vitamins & health supplements guide

 
Rosemary quick review
Botanical description: a shrubby perennial (Rosmarinus officinalis) of the family Labiatae (mint family), with a grayish green appearance.
Active constituents: volatile oil (borneol, camphene, camphor, cineole, limonene, linalool), flavonoids, pinene, resin, tannins, phenolic acids (rosmarinic) and terpenoids.
Health benefits: stimulates the flow of digestive juices, relieves muscle pain and spasm, stimulates hair growth, and supports the circulatory and nervous systems.

Dosage: usual daily oral dosage is 4 to 6 grams of dried rosemary (about 1 teaspoonful).
Side effects: overdose may cause coma, spasm, vomiting, uterine bleeding, kidney irritation, swelling in the lungs, and possibly death.
 
Rosemary by Natures Sunshine
Rosemary Pure Essential Oil (Rosemarinus officinalis, steam-distilled) has a strong aroma that is balancing, invigorating, revitalizing and regenerating. It conditions the scalp and has been used for centuries on oily hair and skin. Click here for more information.
 

Rosemary


Rosemary is a shrubby perennial (Rosmarinus officinalis) of the family Labiatae (mint family). This aromatic perennial evergreen shrub has a grayish green appearance. The plant appears as a shrub with small evergreen leaves which are dark green above, whitish and glandular underneath. The upright varieties grow as a shrub to be up to 5-feet tall and 2- to 3-feet across. The thick, leathery leaves resemble needles, with a dark green upper surface and powdery white, hairy underside. It has tiny blue, white or pink hooded flowers that grow in clusters of two to three per branch. The small, pale blue, pink, or white flowers grow in clusters of two or three along branches. The herb is aromatic with a characteristic taste and smell.
 

Active constituents of rosemary


The active constituents of rosemary include a volatile oil (borneol, camphene, camphor, cineole, limonene, linalool), flavonoids, pinene, resin, tannins, phenolic acids (rosmarinic) and terpenoids.
 

Medicinal uses and health benefits of rosemary


Rosemary is a circulatory and nervine stimulant. Rosemary stimulates the flow of digestive juices. The tannins and essential oil act as diuretics. Rosemary has been also found to be a stimulant and mild analgesic. Traditionally, rosemary has been used by herbalists to improve memory, relieve muscle pain and spasm, stimulate hair growth, and support the circulatory and nervous systems. Rosemary may affect the menstrual cycle, act as an abortifacient, relieve menstrual cramps, increase urine flow, and reduce kidney pain. Rosemary helps to reduce inflammation and have antioxidant properties. Rosemary is a stimulant and mild analgesic, and has been used to treat headaches, epilepsy, poor circulation, and many ailments for which stimulants are prescribed. Rosemary helps to relax muscles, including the smooth muscles of the digestive tract and uterus. Externally it may be used to ease muscular pain, sciatica and neuralgia. It acts as a stimulant to both the hair follicles and circulation in the scalp and thus may be helpful in premature baldness.
 

Dosage and administration of rosemary


The usual daily oral dosage is 4 to 6 grams of dried rosemary (about 1 teaspoonful). Rosemary can be used in the bath to refresh and stimulate a weary body. For a bath additive, combine 50 grams (about 3 tablespoonfuls) with 1 liter of hot water. A hair rinse is made by steeping a sprig of rosemary in 1 cup of boiling water for 5 to 10 minutes. Use the rinse after shampooing. Preparations of 6 to 10% essential oil in a semi-solid or liquid base can be applied externally.
 

Side effects, precautions, interactions


Rosemary is generally considered safe when taken in recommended doses. Extremely large dose could cause serious side effects, including coma, spasm, vomiting, inflammation of the digestive tract, uterine bleeding, kidney irritation, swelling in the lungs, and possibly death. Internal intake of the herb and oil should be avoided during pregnancy because the oil may act as an abortifacient People with aspirin sensitivities should avoid the use of rosemary. People with high blood pressure, epilepsy or diverticulosis, chronic ulcers, or colitis, should not take rosemary internally for medicinal purposes.