Vitamin supplements guide   Vitamins & health supplements guide

 
Inositol (vitamin Bh) review
Basics: a type of sugar related to glucose, an essential eukaryotic metabolite, exists as the fiber component phytic acid.
Benefits: necessary for proper function of nerves, brain, and muscles in the body, used in the treatment of liver problems, depression, panic disorder, and diabetes.
Dosage: no recommended daily allowance for inositol, normal human dietary intake is about 1 gram per day.
Sources: wheat germ, brewer's yeast, bananas, liver, brown rice, oak flakes, nuts, unrefined molasses, vegetables, and raisins.
Deficiency: deficiency symptoms includes eczema, hair loss, constipation, and abnormalities of the eyes and raised cholesterol.
 
Editor's choice: Inositol Powder
Required for the formation of cell membrane, inositol is vital to healthy cell membranes, especially the specialized cells in the brain, bone marrow, eyes and intestines. Inositol is an essential component of the phospholipids that make up cellular membranes, and so is found in virtually every cell in the body. Click here for more information.
 

Sources of inositol


Inositol is available from both plant and animal sources. Natural sources of inositol include wheat germ, brewer's yeast, bananas, liver, brown rice, oak flakes, nuts, unrefined molasses, vegetables, and raisins. Available naturally from plant and animal sources, the plant form of inositol is combined with six phosphates and is known as the "anti-nutrient" phytic acid. Most dietary inositol is in the form of phytate, a naturally occurring plant fiber that is believed to possess antioxidant properties. The action of the intestinal bacteria liberates inositol from phytic acid, which is found in citrus fruits, nuts, seeds and legumes, wheat germ, brewers yeast, bananas, liver, beef brains and heart, whole grains such as brown rice, oat flakes, unrefined molasses, raisins and vegetables such as cabbage. In plants, phytic acid binds with minerals, such as iron and calcium, and interferes with their absorption. Mammals, including humans, can also biosynthesize inositol from glucose and patients with diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney failure, and multiple sclerosis (MS), exhibit impaired production.