Vitamin supplements guide   Vitamins & health supplements guide

 
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) review
Basics: water-soluble vitamin, needed to process amino acids and fats, activates vitamin B6 and folic acid, involved in energy production.
Benefits: vitamin B2 helps prevent and treat migraine headaches, cataracts, rheumatoid arthritis, and some skin disorders, vital to maintaining a proper metabolism.
Dosage: riboflavin requirement must equal to the total energy needs and metabolism, generally 1.7 mg/day for an adult man and 1.3 mg/day for an adult woman.
Sources: organ meats such as liver, kidney and heart, milk, yeast, cheese, oily fish, eggs and dark green leafy vegetables.
Deficiency: vitamin B2 (riboflavin) deficiency leads to bloodshot eyes, abnormal sensitivity to light, lesions of the skin.
Overdose: no known toxicity to riboflavin, possible overdose side effects include itching, numbness, burning or prickling sensations.
 
Vitamin B2 by Nature's Way
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) is a precursor to coenzymes involved in the growth and repair of skin and tissues lining the gastro-intestinal tract, as well as the synthesis of amino acids. Riboflavin is utilized by the liver, brain, heart and other tissues. Vitamin B2 by Nature's Way is manuafactured according to the highest pharmaceutical standards and uses only the best quality raw ingredients. Click here for more information.
 

Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) sources


Riboflavin (vitamin B2) is found in a variety of food sources, however, in small amounts. The most abundant sources of this vitamin are milk, milk products and liver. Other food sources of riboflavin are oysters, lean meat, green leafy vegetables, mushrooms, asparagus, broccoli, avocados, Brussels sprouts and salmon. rewer’s yeast is the richest natural source of vitamin B2. Liver, tongue, and other organ meats are also excellent sources. Oily fish, such as mackerel, trout, eel, herring, and shad, have substantial levels of riboflavin, too. Nori seaweed is a fine source. Milk products have some riboflavin, as do eggs, shellfish, millet and wild rice, dried peas, beans, and some seeds such as sunflower.

High levels of vitamin B2 are found in cheese, egg yolks, almonds, organ meats, whole grains, wild rice, soybeans, milk, spinach, mushrooms, almonds, and poultry. The best sources of riboflavin include brewer's yeast, almonds, organ meats, whole grains, wheat germ, wild rice, mushrooms, soybeans, milk, yogurt, eggs, broccoli, brussel sprouts, and spinach. Flours and cereals are often fortified with riboflavin. Brewer’s yeast is the richest natural source of vitamin B2. Liver, tongue, and other organ meats are also excellent sources. Oily fish, such as mackerel, trout, eel, herring, and shad, have substantial levels of riboflavin, too. Nori seaweed is also a fine source. Milk products have some riboflavin, as do eggs, shellfish, millet and wild rice, dried peas, beans, and some seeds such as sunflower. Other foods with moderate amounts of riboflavin are dark leafy green vegetables, such as asparagus, collards, broccoli, and spinach, whole or enriched grain products, mushrooms, and avocados. Lower levels of vitamin B2 are found in cabbage, carrots, cucumbers, apples, figs, berries, grapes, and tropical fruits.

Other foods with moderate amounts of riboflavin are dark leafy green vegetables, such as asparagus, collards, broccoli, and spinach, whole or enriched grain products, mushrooms, and avocados. Lower levels of vitamin B2 are found in cabbage, carrots, cucumbers, apples, figs, berries, grapes, and tropical fruits. Riboflavin is reported to be stable to heat, therefore, it is least likely lost during cooking. However, baking soda is reportedly destructive to the vitamin stability when it is added during cooking. In addition, because this vitamin is sensitive to light, the storage of such foods in clear containers may destroy the vitamin.