Vitamin supplements guide   Vitamins & health supplements guide

 
Leucine quick review
Description: a member of the branched-chain amino acid family, obtained by the hydrolysis of protein by pancreatic enzymes during digestion.
Health benefits: necessary for the optimal growth of infants and for the nitrogen balance in adults, used as a source for the synthesis of blood sugar in the liver.

Sources & dosage: beans, brewer's yeast, brown rice bran, caseinate, corn, dairy products, etc. Young adults need about 31 mg of this amino acid per day per kg of body weight.
Deficiency symptoms: deficiency of leucine can cause a biochemical malfunction producing hypoglycemia in infants. Symptoms include dizziness, fatigue, headaches, irritability etc.
 
BCAA Plus Caps by Prolab Nutrition
Prolab BCAA Plus provides the essential amino acids L-Leucine, L-Valine and L-Isoleucine. These three protein-sparing amino acids are known as branched chain. It is a well known fact that amino acids are responsible for protein synthesis, hence the nickname building blocks. BCAAs are important in your quest for muscle growth and recuperation. Your body cannot manufacture its own BCAAs they must be supplied through your diet. Click here for more information.
 

Leucine


Leucine is one of the 20 most common amino acids on earth, and coded for by DNA. Its chemical composition is identical to that of isoleucine, but its atoms are arranged differently resulting in different properties. Leucine is obtained by the hydrolysis of protein by pancreatic enzymes during digestion and necessary for optimal growth in infants and children and for the maintenance of nitrogen balance in adults. Leucine is a member of the branched-chain amino acid family, along with valine and isoleucine. The branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are found in proteins of all life forms. The three branched-chain amino acids constitute approximately 70 percent of the amino acids in the body proteins. Leucine is an essential amino acid, meaning it cannot be synthesised by the body and must be obtained through food.

 

Leucine functions, uses, and health benefits


Leucine is necessary for the optimal growth of infants and for the nitrogen balance in adults. It appears to have no particular therapeutic role, but it is vital in supporting functions. Leucine lowers elevated blood sugar levels and is necessary in promoting the healing of bones, skin, and muscle tissue. Leucine is used as a source for the synthesis of blood sugar in the liver during starvation, stress, and infection to aid in healing. Leucine is a direct-acting nutrient signal that regulates protein synthesis in adipose tissue. Leucine works with valine and isoleucine to protect and fuel the muscles. Leucine is believed to help a person maintain muscle mass, which is essential for long-term weight management because muscle helps the body burn more calories. Supplements and protein powders that contain leucine are used extensively by bodybuilders and other athletes to promote muscle recovery. It also works to increase endurance and enhance energy. Leucine is an important amino acid for the production of hemoglobin. It maintains blood sugar levels and increases growth hormone (HGH) production. Leucine is found in both animal and vegetable products. The branched chain amino acids (BCAA), valine and Leucine, play an important role in stress, energy and muscle metabolism. BCAAs may be helpful in a minority of patients with hepatic encephalopathy.
 

Dietary sources of leucine


Leucine is found primarily in high quality protein foods such as beans, brewer's yeast, brown rice bran, caseinate, corn, dairy products, eggs, fish, hemp seed, lactalbumin, legumes, meat, nuts, pumpkin seeds, seafood, seeds, soy, squash seeds, whey, whole grains.

 

Leucine dosage, intake


Young adults need about 31 mg of this amino acid per day per kilogram (14 mg per lb) of body weight. Therapeutic use of leucine occurs at doses between 500 and 1,000 mg per day. Follow with your doctor's avices for how much leucine you should take.

 

Leucine deficiency


Deficiency of leucine is rare. Insulin deficiency is known to result in poor utilization of leucine. A deficiency of leucine can cause a biochemical malfunction producing hypoglycemia in infants. Hypoglycemia symptoms may include dizziness, fatigue, headaches, irritability etc.
 

Toxicity, side effects, interactions, and contraindications


Leucine is considered safe for general use. People with depression, liver or kidney disease should avoid taking large amounts of leucine due to the changes of blood levels. Leucine may interfere with L-dopa, however, a medication used to control the symptoms of Parkinson's disease and should be used only under medical supervision in these patients.