Vitamin supplements guide   Vitamins & health supplements guide

 
Calendula quick review
Botanical description: also known as garden marigold, holligold, goldbloom, golds, ruddes, Mary bud, bull's eyes, and pot marigold. an annual plant typically be found in Europe, Western Asia, and the United States.
Active constituents: flavonoids such as flavonols (isorhamnetin, quercetin) and flavonol glycosides including isoquercitrin, narcissin, neoliesperoside and rutin; volatile oil with sesquiterpenes, and also containing menthone, isomenthone, caryophyllene, pedunculatine, and a large number ofn acylated pentacyclic hydroxytriterpenes; sterols; coumarins such as scopoletin, umbelliferon and aesculetin, carotenoids.
Health benefits : acts on the liver and gallbladder to improve the quality of bile, a digestive secretion from the liver that helps to break down dietary fats into smaller fragments for digestion. speedS up wound-healing by increasing blood flow to the affected area and promoting the production of collagen proteins.
Side effects : may cause a rash or irritation, may affect the menstrual cycle and should not be used during pregnancy and breastfeeding.
 
Calendula Gel by Boiron
Calendula officinalis promotes healing of the skin especially minor burns, scrapes, and skin irritations. It also eases sunburn and minor cuts. Click here for more information.
 

Calendula


Calendula (Calendula officinalis) is an annual plant that thrives in virtually any soil but can typically be found in Europe, Western Asia, and the United States. The name Calendula comes from the Latin word calendae, meaning the first day of the month, referring to the plant's continual flowering pattern. Calendula is also known as garden marigold, holligold, goldbloom, golds, ruddes, Mary bud, bull's eyes, and pot marigold. Calendula grows to 12 to 30 inches and produces edible yellow-orange flowers from spring through fall. The flowers are collected when fully open and then dried. The lower leaves of the plant are paddle-shaped whilst the upper leaves are smaller and more pointed. Calendula prefers average, well-drained soil and partial shade to full sun.
 

Medicinal uses and health benefits of calendula


The primary active compounds of calendula include include flavonoids such as flavonols (isorhamnetin, quercetin) and flavonol
glycosides including isoquercitrin, narcissin, neoliesperoside and rutin; volatile oil with sesquiterpenes, and also containing menthone, isomenthone, caryophyllene, pedunculatine, and a large number ofn acylated pentacyclic hydroxytriterpenes; sterols; coumarins such as scopoletin, umbelliferon and aesculetin, carotenoids.

Calendula contains chemicals which speed up wound-healing by several actions that include increasing blood flow to the affected area and promoting the production of collagen proteins. The flowers have antispasmodic, antimicrobial, and antiviral properties. Calendula petals have anti-inflammatory, astringent, and antiseptic (antibacterial and antiviral) properties, and may even offer immune-stimulating actions. Astringent actions promote healing. Calendula can reduce the swelling and itching associated with insect bites and may even help to prevent infection due to its antimicrobial actions. The dried petals of the calendula plant are used in tinctures, ointments, and washes to speed the healing of burns, bruises, and cuts. Local application, in the form of a plant poultice or an infusion soaked in a cloth and applied to a wound, is an effective healing remedy.

Calendula was used to treat various skin diseases, ranging from skin ulcerations to eczema. Calendula has been administered internally for a variety of ailments, including ulcers, stomach cramps, colitis, herpes viruses, yeast infections, and diarrhea. Calendula acts on the liver and gallbladder to improve the quality of bile, a digestive secretion from the liver that helps to break down dietary fats into smaller fragments for digestion. Calendula is used in herbal medicine as a menstrual cycle normaliser. Painful menstruation may also be relieved by Calendula.

 

Side effects, precautions, interactions


Calendula is a relatively mild, nontoxic herbal supplements and side effects are rarely reported. For some people, topical use may cause a rash or irritation. Calendula may affect the menstrual cycle and should not be used during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Calendula products should always be protected from light and moisture, and should not be used after three years of storage.