Vitamin supplements guide   Vitamins & health supplements guide

 
Garlic quick review
Botanical description: a bulbous perennial plant of the lily family, with a powerful onionlike aroma and pungent taste. Also known as rocambole, ajo, allium, stinking rose.
Active constituents: volatile oil with sulphur-containing compounds (allicin, alliin, and ajoene), enzymes (allinase, peroxidase and myrosinase), glucokinins, B group vitamins, vitamin C and flavonoids, citral, geraniol, linalool, aphellandrene and B phellandrene, trace minerals including copper, iron, zinc, magnesium, germanium, and selenium.
Health benefits : antibiotic, antihistamine, anticoagulant, expectorant, antibacterial, antiparasitic, alterative, diaphoretic, diuretic, expectorant, stimulant, and antispasmodic.

Dosage: daily oral dosage is 4 grams of fresh garlic or 8 milligrams of garlic oil per day. For high cholesterol and hardening of the arteries, typical doses range from 600 to 900 milligrams daily.
Side effects : excessive intake of raw garlic can cause bloating, gas, cramping, diarrhea, flatulence, and changes in the intestinal flora.
 
Garlic Once-Per-Day by Vitabase
Vitabase's garlic powder used in this product comes exclusively from Pure-Gar, the world's largest and most advanced garlic grower and processing company. Their process begins with high allicin yield garlic bulb strains which are harvested and then gently cool-dried as part of a proprietary process that prevents the allicin from forming until it is ingested. Each odorless garlic tablet has been specially coated to allow for release in the small intestines. This allows absorption to occur in the small intestine instead of the stomach where the powerful digestive juices would destroy the allicin. Click here for more information.
 

Garlic


Garlic is a bulbous perennial plant of the lily family, with a powerful onionlike aroma and pungent taste. Garlic originally came from central Asia, and is now cultivated throughout the world. Garlic (Allium sativum) belongs to the Amaryllidaceae family. Garlic is a perennial that can grow two feet high or more. Garlic bulb is made up of sections called cloves, each encased in its own parchmentlike membrane. The bulb has a strong and characteristic odor and an acrid taste, and when pure yields an offensively smelling oil, essence of garlic, identical with allyl sulphide. Cloves planted in late summer or fall develop extensive roots before winter, with little or no visible shoot growth. Each of the cloves, which make up the complete bulb, develops from an auxiliary bud at the leaf base. The leaves reach about 12 inches in height. The leaves which are most exterior on the growing shoot form the sheath leaves which protect the bulb. Garlic has been used as flavoring agent, condiment, and for medicinal purposes for over 5,000 years. The parts of the plant used medicinally include fresh bulbs, dried bulbs, and oil extracted from the garlic. Garlic is also known as rocambole, ajo, allium, stinking rose, rustic treacle, nectar of the gods, camphor of the poor, poor man's treacle, and clove garlic.
 

Active constituents of garlic


Garlic contains many active constituents, including volatile oil with sulphur-containing compounds (allicin, alliin, and ajoene), enzymes (allinase, peroxidase and myrosinase), glucokinins, B group vitamins, vitamin C and flavonoids, citral, geraniol, linalool, aphellandrene and B phellandrene. Garlic also contains a wide range of trace minerals. These include copper, iron, zinc, magnesium, germanium, and selenium. The key therapeutic ingredient in garlic is alliin. Alliin is an odorless sulfur-containing chemical derived from the amino acid cysteine. Allicin is formed when alliin, a sulfur-containing amino acid, comes into contact with the enzyme alliinase when raw garlic is chopped, crushed, or chewed. Allicin is what gives garlic its antibiotic properties and is responsible for its strong odor. Allicin is said to be stronger than penicillin and tetracycline, and microbes do not mutate when repeatedly exposed to garlic. Allicin is further broken down to a compound called ajoene. Ajoene contributes to the anticoagulant action of garlic. It may be the substance that inhibits blockage in blood vessels from clots and atherosclerosis.
 

Medicinal uses and health benefits of garlic


Garlic is antibiotic, antihistamine, anticoagulant, expectorant, antibacterial, antiparasitic, alterative, diaphoretic, diuretic, expectorant, stimulant, and antispasmodic. Garlic has been used orally as an antioxidant to reduce cholesterol and triglycerides, hardening of
the arteries and blood clotting, blood pressure, and to prevent cancer, to protect the liver. Garlic has antibiotic, antiviral, and antifungal properties, it is used to increase the effects of the immune system; to reduce blood sugar levels; and to reduce menstrual pain. Topical applications on the skin can help treat corns, warts, calluses, ear infections, muscle pain, nerve pain, arthritis, and sciatica.

Garlic has antioxidant properties. The antioxidants found in garlic may contribute to this effect by protecting against the cell damage by cancer-causing free radicals. Antioxidants can neutralize free radicals and may reduce or even help prevent some of the damage they cause over time. Garlic may increase the number of natural killer cells, which destroy white cells that are cancerous or infected by viruses. Garlic blocks the formation of powerful carcinogens, called nitrosamines, which may be formed during the digestion of food. Garlic contains allyl sulfur and other compounds that slow or prevent the growth of tumor cells. Garlic may slow the production of HIV by stimulating natural killer cells. People with HIV often use garlic to prevent infections associated with HIV.

Garlic may have positive effects in preventing cardiovascular diseases, such as heart attack or stroke. Garlic helps to prevent atherosclerosis through the actions of its sulfur compounds and its ability to reduce the fatty substances, such as cholesterol, found in the bloodstream. Garlic acts as a blood thinner. Garlic promotes the regression of fatty deposits in blood vessels, a major cause of atherosclerosis, and can even help reverse arterial blockages caused by the collection of plaque. Garlic can lower and help keep blood sugar stable by helping to increase the amount of insulin available in the bloodstream. lood clots and plaque block blood flow and contribute to the development of atherosclerosis. Garlic significantly lowers blood levels of triglycerides which have been associated with an increased risk of heart attack.

Garlic works as an immune system stimulant which helps the body fight bacterial, viral and fungal infections. Garlic can be used in the treatment of a variety of bacterial, viral, and fungal infections. Garlic inhibits the growth of different species of bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the organism responsible for tuberculosis, and Shigella dysenteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Psudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus, Salmonella, etc. It is effective for bronchial conditions such as inflammatory disease, tuberculosis, asthma and hepatopulonary syndrome.

 

Dosage and administration of garlic


Garlic products are made from whole fresh garlic, fresh or dried garlic cloves, garlic powder made from the dried cloves, freeze-dried garlic, or oil garlic extracts. The usual daily oral dosage is 4 grams of fresh garlic or 8 milligrams of garlic oil per day, which is equivalent to approximately 18 mg of alliin (9 mg of allicin). For high cholesterol and hardening of the arteries, typical doses range from 600 to 900 milligrams daily. For high blood pressure, take 200 to 300 milligrams 3 times daily. Garlic oil can be made by crushing cloves and steeping in olive oil for one to two weeks. Refrigerate and use to massage into affected areas of arthritis, rheumatism, sprains, strains, and chest infections. The garlic oil will stay fresh in the refrigerator for up to two years.
 

Side effects, precautions, interactions


Adverse side effects associated with garlic supplements are rare. However, raw garlic can be very irritating to the digestive system. Consumption of excessive amounts of raw garlic can cause bloating, gas, cramping, diarrhea, flatulence, and changes in the intestinal flora. Fresh garlic applied to the skin could result in blistering, chemical burns, or dermatitis. Large doses of garlic may interact with protease inhibitors. Use of garlic is contraindicated in individuals using the anticoagulant drug warfarin.