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Progesterone quick review
Hormone description: a steroid hormone secreted by the corpus luteum of the ovary and by the placenta, belongs to a class of hormones called progestagens.
Biological functions: involved in the female menstrual cycle, pregnancy (supports gestation) and embryogenesis of humans and other species.

Health benefits: prepares the uterus for a possible pregnancy each month and supports the fertilized egg if conception occurs, helps prepare the breasts for milk production and breastfeeding.
Side effects : increased risk of cancer, abnormal menstrual flow, nausea, depression, masculinizing effects, and fluid retention.
 
Nature's Precise Cream
Hormone replacement creams have recently been the subject of warnings about the potential dangers of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). With Nature's Precise Cream - Natural Progesterone - you will be able to enjoy the benefits of getting balanced hormones naturally, but will not be faced with unnecessary health risks. Some common symptoms that might be experienced with unbalanced hormones can include: anxiety, excessive menstruation, migraines before menstruation, restless sleep, strong premenstrual symptoms, swollen breasts, and swollen hands and/or feet. Click here for more information.
 

Progesterone


Progesterone is a steroid hormone secreted by the corpus luteum of the ovary and by the placenta, that acts to prepare the uterus for implantation of the fertilized ovum, to maintain pregnancy, and to promote development of the mammary glands. The hormone produced by the corpus luteum during the second half of a woman's cycle. It thickens the lining of the uterus to prepare it to accept
implantation of a fertilized egg. It is released in pulses, so the amount in the bloodstream is not constant. Progesterone belongs to a class of hormones called progestagens, and is the only naturally occurring human progestagen. Progesterone should not be confused with progestins, which are synthetically produced progestagens. Like other steroids, progesterone consists of four interconnected cyclic hydrocarbons. Progesterone contains ketone and aldehyde functional groups, as well as two methyl branches. Like all steroid hormones, it is hydrophobic. Progesterone is produced in the female body in the ovaries. Progesterone production is high during the luteal phase (second portion) of the menstrual cycle and low during the follicular phase (first portion), as well as being low before puberty and after menopause. Supplemental sources of progesterone are available in oral and cream forms, as well as lozenges, suppositories, and injectable forms.

Progesterone is a female sex hormone that plays an important physiological role to regularize and rebuild changes to the body caused by estrogen as well as in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Progesterone is a principal female reproductive hormone which naturally balances estrogen, the second major female hormone. Many women have excess estrogen, which increases the risk of breast cancer cancer of the uterus, and osteoporosis. Excess estrogen can also severely worsen premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Progesterone is a pro-gestational hormone with a role in maintaining pregnancy. The hormone is produced in the ovaries, the placenta (when a woman gets pregnant) and in the adrenal glands. Progesterone helps prepare your body for conception and pregnancy and regulates the monthly menstrual cycle. It also plays a role in sexual desire.

 

Functions and usages of progesterone


Progesterone is a steroid hormone involved in the female menstrual cycle, pregnancy (supports gestation) and embryogenesis of humans and other species. Progesterone is the most potent natural progestational hormone. During pregnancy, progesterone is also produced by the placenta. Progesterone regulates the female reproductive functions together with estrogen and plays a particular role in the maintenance of pregnancy. Progesterone induces the cyclic changes in the endometrium that allow implantation of the fertilized ovum. Progesterone is also responsible for maintenance of the uterus during pregnancy, suppression of uterine contractions until just prior to parturition and preparation of the breasts for lactation.

Progesterone serves to thicken the uterine lining, preparing the uterus to support the fertilized egg, or zygote. Progesterone, along with estrogen, prepares the uterus (womb) for a possible pregnancy each month and supports the fertilized egg if conception occurs. Progesterone also helps prepare the breasts for milk production and breastfeeding. Progesterone is used to prevent overgrowth of the endometrium of postmenopausal women who have not had a hysterectomy and are receiving estrogen replacement therapy. Progesterone is also used to treat the absence of menstruation due to progesterone deficiency. Progesterone is a female hormone important for the regulation of ovulation and menstruation. In men, progesterone probably has no normal function except as an intermediate in the synthesis of other steroid hormones. In women, progesterone prepares the uterus for pregnancy and the breasts for milk production. After ovulation, progesterone blocks proliferation of the endometrium and stimulates the uterus to prepare for implantation of a fertilized egg. Progesterone levels continue to rise in early pregnancy.

 

Progesterone side effects


Adverse side effects are very rare with natural progesterone. The only side effect of concern is that it might slightly alter the timing of the menstrual cycle, when taken inappropriately. Side effects of synthetic progesterone include increased risk of cancer, abnormal menstrual flow, nausea, depression, masculinizing effects, and fluid retention. Overall, natural progesterone is considerably safer than progestins and is therefore preferred by many doctors in situations where either would be effective. Too much progesterone often causes tiredness and even sedation. This side effect can be beneficial in a women who has epilepsy or even uterine irritability causing preterm labor because progesterone in high doses can decrease seizure activity and uterine contractions.

 

Taking progesterone properly


The proper amount of progesterone for a woman should be determined by a doctor. Progesterone can be given in the form of vaginal suppositories, injections (shots) or by mouth. The method of administration is best determined by availability, convenience of use and price. Progesterone creams are purported to be absorbed through the skin. From the skin, it is theorized, that the hormone crosses into bloodstream through the capillaries. Progesterone shots is usually given in the form of progesterone in oil, doses peak at about 12 hours after administration and take at least 48 hours or more to clear. Progesterone oral medication comes in several different forms that are taken by mouth. Some are swallowed with water, but others (troches) are placed under your tongue until it dissolves. Ask the pharmacist to explain the correct way to use this form of progesterone.