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Resveratrol quick review
Description: belongs to a class of polyphenolic compounds called stilbenes, a fat-soluble compound that occurs in a trans and a cis configuration.
Health benefits: unctions as an antioxidant and thus could hamper free radical damage linked to cancer, increase HDL cholesterol and thus reduce the risk for heart disease.

Sources & dosage: red grapes, wine, in peanuts, blueberries, pines, the roots and stalks of Japanese knotweed (hu zhang in China) and giant knotweed.
 
Resveratrol Plus by Vitabase
Resveratrol is a powerful antioxidant. One scientist referred to it as "one of the best free radical scavengers." This may account for its beneficial effects. Free radicals are produced naturally by the body and can damage healthy cells. In addition to the antioxidant properties of resveratrol, Vitabase formula includes red wine extract and grape seed extract which provide polyphenols. Polyphenols are believed to also have antioxidant effects which may positively impact cardiovascular health. Click here for more information.
 

Resveratrol


Resveratrol is a natural compound found in grapes, mulberries, peanuts, and other plants or food products, especially red wine. Resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene) belongs to a class of polyphenolic compounds called stilbenes. Resveratrol is produced in plants with the help of the enzyme stilbene synthase, and which has anti-fungal properties. Resveratrol is a fat-soluble compound that occurs in a trans and a cis configuration. It functions as an antioxidant and thus could hamper free radical damage linked to cancer. It is also believed to have anti-infective and anti-inflammatory properties, increase HDL ("the good") cholesterol and thus reduce the risk for heart disease.
 

Resveratrol health benefits


Resveratrol significantly extends the lifespan of yeast. All higher plants have the enzyme chalcone synthase, which is very similar to stilbene synthase but does not produce resveratrol. In yeast resveratrol activates the SIR2 gene, a gene which produces an NAD-dependent deacetylase which causes DNA to become more compact by the removal of acetyl groups from the lysine residues of histones. Compacting of DNA reduces gene expression, but also increases genome stability therefore "extending lifespan" (better described as hibernation). It is believed to have longevity-enhancing properties by acting as a CR-mimetic, antioxidant and optimizer of beneficial cellular apoptosis. Resveratrol has several activities that may account for its possible cardioprotective action. These include inhibition of the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), inhibition of smooth muscle cell proliferation and inhibition of platelet aggregation. Resveratrol thins the blood more effectively than aspirin. resveratrol may interfere with the development of cancer in three ways: by blocking the action of cancer-causing agents, by inhibiting the development and growth of tumors, and by causing precancerous cells to revert to normal. Resveratrol has been found to inhibit the proliferation of a variety of human cancer cell lines, including those from breast, prostate, stomach, colon, pancreatic and thyroid cancers.
 

Dietary sources of resveratrol


Resveratrol is found in the skins of certain red grapes, wine, in peanuts, blueberries, some pines (Scots pine, eastern white pine) and the roots and stalks of Japanese knotweed (hu zhang in China) and giant knotweed. The concentration of resveratrol in red wine is much higher than that of white wine. Resveratrol is also found in significant amounts in the dried roots and stems of the plant Polygonium cuspidatum Sieb. Et Zucc., also known as the Japanese knotweed.