Vitamin supplements guide   Vitamins & health supplements guide

 
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) review
Basics: water-soluble vitamin, needed to process amino acids and fats, activates vitamin B6 and folic acid, involved in energy production.
Benefits: vitamin B2 helps prevent and treat migraine headaches, cataracts, rheumatoid arthritis, and some skin disorders, vital to maintaining a proper metabolism.
Dosage: riboflavin requirement must equal to the total energy needs and metabolism, generally 1.7 mg/day for an adult man and 1.3 mg/day for an adult woman.
Sources: organ meats such as liver, kidney and heart, milk, yeast, cheese, oily fish, eggs and dark green leafy vegetables.
Deficiency: vitamin B2 (riboflavin) deficiency leads to bloodshot eyes, abnormal sensitivity to light, lesions of the skin.
Overdose: no known toxicity to riboflavin, possible overdose side effects include itching, numbness, burning or prickling sensations.
 
Vitamin B2 by Nature's Way
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) is a precursor to coenzymes involved in the growth and repair of skin and tissues lining the gastro-intestinal tract, as well as the synthesis of amino acids. Riboflavin is utilized by the liver, brain, heart and other tissues. Vitamin B2 by Nature's Way is manuafactured according to the highest pharmaceutical standards and uses only the best quality raw ingredients. Click here for more information.
 

Vitamin B2 (riboflavin)


Riboflavin, also known as vitamin B2, is an easily absorbed, water-soluble micronutrient with a key role in maintaining human health. Riboflavin is an orange powder, and water solutions have intense greenish yellow fluorescence. Vitamin B2 is a water-soluble vitamin, one that cannot be stored by the body except in insignificant amounts. It must be replenished daily.

Like the other B vitamins, it supports energy production by aiding in the metabolising of fats, carbohydrates, and proteins. Vitamin B2 is also required for red blood cell formation and respiration, antibody production, and for regulating human growth and reproduction. It is essential for healthy skin, nails, hair growth and general good health, including regulating thyroid activity.

Riboflavin or vitamin B2 is an essential nutrient in human nutrition and plays a key role in the production of energy. Vitamin B2 is needed to process amino acids and fats, activate vitamin B6 and folic acid, and help convert carbohydrates into the fuel the body runs on. Under some conditions, vitamin B2 can act as an antioxidant. Vitamin B2 is an intermediary the transfer of electrons in the cellular oxidation-reduction reactions which generate energy from protein, carbohydrate and fat. The riboflavin coenzymes are also important for the transformation of vitamin B6 and folic acid into their respective active forms, and for the conversion of tryptophan into niacin. Riboflavin is involved in energy production as part of the electron transport chain that produces cellular energy.

 

Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) functions, uses, and health benefits


Riboflavin is an integral component of the coenzymes that participate in many energy-yielding metabolic pathways. Like its close relative vitamin B1 (thiamine), riboflavin plays a crucial role in certain metabolic reactions, particularly the conversion of carbohydrates into sugar, which is "burned" to produce energy. They promote the first steps in the metabolism (breakdown and production) of glucose and of fatty acids. The metabolism of some vitamins and minerals also require riboflavin. Riboflavin is essential for tissue respiration and the generation of energy from the carbohydrates, acids and fats. It is important for body growth and red blood cell production and helps in releasing energy from carbohydrates.

Vitamin B2 helps prevent and is used to treat migraine headaches, cataracts, rheumatoid arthritis, and a number of skin disorders such as acne (acne rosacea), dermatitis, and eczema. In the treatment of anemia, adding Vitamin B2 to iron supplements has shown to increase its effectiveness. Vital to maintaining a proper metabolism, riboflavin also helps to shore up the immune system by reinforcing antibody reserves, the body's first line of defense against infection. Along with iron, riboflavin is essential for producing the red blood cells that carry oxygen throughout the body. In addition, the body uses extra riboflavin to keep tissue in good repair and speed healing of wounds, burns and other injuries. Along with such B vitamins as vitamin B6 and niacin (which it helps the body convert into active forms), riboflavin protects the nervous system. It may therefore have a role to play in treating nervous system conditions such as numbness and tingling, Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, and even anxiety, stress, and fatigue. Carpal tunnel syndrome may benefit from a treatment program including this vitamin when combined with vitamin B6. The body needs vitamin B2 for reproduction and it also enhances the immune system's ability to fight disease.

Riboflavin is vital for normal reproduction, growth, repair and development of body tissues including the skin, hair, nails, connective tissue and immune system. Riboflavin (vitamin B2) works with the other B vitamins. Dietary and supplemental vitamin B2, along with other nutrients is important for normal vision and prevention of cataracts. Riboflavin's ability to improve the skin's secretion of mucus may aid in clearing up skin pustules associated with rosacea.

 

Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) dosage, intake, recommended daily allowance (RDA)


The RDA for riboflavin varies according to weight, metabolic rate, growth, and caloric intake. Riboflavin requirement must equal to the total energy needs and metabolism. The recommended daily allowance (RDA) for riboflavin is 1.7 mg/day for an adult man and 1.3 mg/day for an adult woman. The amounts found in many multivitamin supplements (20–25 mg) are more than adequate for most people. Women that are pregnant require and additional 0.3 mg per day and those that are lactating require an additional 0.5 mg per day.

 

Sources of vitamin B2 (riboflavin)


Sources of riboflavin include organ meats (liver, kidney, and heart) and certain plants such as almonds, mushrooms, whole grain, soybeans, and green leafy vegetables. The richest sources of riboflavin include organ meats such as liver, kidney and heart. Milk, yeast, cheese, oily fish, eggs and dark green leafy vegetables are also rich sources. Flour and cereals are enriched with riboflavin. Riboflavin is stable when heated but will leach into cooking water. It is easily destroyed by light, and foods stored in clear containers will lose their riboflavin content in a short period of time. Because riboflavin is destroyed by exposure to light, foods with riboflavin should not be stored in glass containers that are exposed to light. Breads and cereals are often fortified with riboflavin. Because riboflavin is destroyed by exposure to light, foods with riboflavin should not be stored in glass containers that are exposed to light.

 

Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) deficiency


Riboflavin deficiency has profound effects on the metabolism of carbohydrates, fats, and protein. All three of these basic food elements require riboflavin if they are to be properly utilized by the body. A deficiency of vitamin B2 (riboflavin) may result in bloodshot eyes, abnormal sensitivity to light, itching and burning of the eyes, inflammation in the mouth, a sore and burning tongue, and cracks on the lips and in the corners of the mouth. It may also result in dull or oily hair, an oily skin, premature wrinkles on the face and arms, and split nails. Riboflavin deficiency also leads to the malfunctioning of the adrenal glands. Vitamin B2 deficiency can occur in alcoholics. Riboflavin deficiency also occurs in those with chronic liver disease, chronic alcoholics and those who receive total parenteral nutrition (TPN) with inadequate riboflavin. Deficiency of riboflavin is primarily manifested in the skin and mucous membranes. Characteristic symptoms of riboflavin deficiency include lesions of the skin, especially in the corners of the mouth, and a red, sore tongue. The first signs and symptoms of deficiency are a sore throat and sores at the corners of the mouth. Worsening symptoms include a swollen tongue, seborrheic dermatitis, anemia and impaired nerve function.
 

Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) overdose, toxicity, side effects


There is no known toxicity to riboflavin. Because riboflavin is a water-soluble vitamin, excess amounts are easily excreted by the body in the urine. Possible reactions to very high doses may include itching, numbness, burning or prickling sensations, and sensitivity to light. Excess riboflavin excreted in the urine causes it to become bright yellow in color, which many people notice when they take B vitamin supplements.