Vitamin supplements guide   Vitamins & health supplements guide

 
Phosphorus quick review
Biological functions: inorganic phosphorus in the form of the phosphate PO43- plays a major role in biological molecules such as DNA and RNA, the main structural components of all cellular membranes.
Health benefits: essential for normal heart and kidney functioning, speeds up the healing of broken bones, needed to balance and metabolize other vitamins and minerals.
Deficiency symptoms: loss of appetite, anxiety, bone pain, bone fragility, stiffness in the joints, fatigue, irregular breathing, irritability, numbness, weakness, and weight change.

Sources & dosage: meat, poultry, fish, eggs, dairy products, nuts, and legumes; the recommended daily allowance for phosphorous is 700 mg daily.

Side efffects: phosphate overdose can lead to diarrhea and calcification (hardening) of organs and soft tissue, result in dangerous imbalances of other vital nutrients.
 
Ultra Minerals by Vitabase
Minerals are divided into two classes: macrominerals and trace minerals. Macrominerals are needed in larger amounts than trace minerals. Ultra Minerals by Vitabase includes the macrominerals calcium, magnesium and potassium. Important trace minerals in our supplement are iron, iodine, zinc, selenium, copper, manganese, chromium, molybdenum, vanadium and boron. Many of the minerals are chelated which means they have been bonded to a protein molecule. This helps transport them to the blood stream and enhances absorption at the cellular level. Click here for more information.
 

Phosphorus supplements


Phosphorus is an essential mineral that is usually found in nature combined with oxygen as phosphate. Phosphorus is a nutrient required by all organisms for the basic processes of life. Inorganic phosphorus in the form of the phosphate PO43- plays a major role in biological molecules such as DNA and RNA where it forms part of the structural backbone of these molecules. Living cells also utilize phosphate to transport cellular energy via adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Nearly every cellular process that uses energy gets it in the form of ATP. Phospholipids are the main structural components of all cellular membranes. Calcium phosphate salts are used by animals to stiffen their bones. Next to calcium, phosphorus is the most abundant mineral in the body. Approximately 85% of phosphorus in the body can be found in bones and teeth and roughly 10% circulates in the bloodstream. Phosphorus can be found in the environment most commonly as phosphates.

 

Biological functions and health benefits of phosphorus (phosphates)


Phosphorus performs a wide variety of functions. Phosphorus promotes and stimulates early growth and blooming and root growth. It hastens maturity and seed growth, and contributes to the general hardiness of plants. Most phosphate in the human body is in bone, but phosphate-containing molecules (phospholipids) are also important components of cell membranes and lipoprotein particles, such as good (HDL) and bad (LDL) cholesterol. Small amounts of phosphate are engaged in biochemical reactions throughout the body. Phosphorus is a component of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a fundamental energy source in living things. Phosphorus is essential for normal heart and kidney functioning. It speeds up the healing of broken bones and other injuries and functions is to metabolize fats and starches for energy, as well as being necessary for proper nerve impulses and for niacin assimilation. Phosphorus is needed for the growth, maintenance, and repair of all tissues and cells, and for the production of the genetic building blocks, DNA and RNA. Phosphorus is also needed to balance and metabolize other vitamins and minerals, including vitamin D, calcium, iodine, magnesium, and zinc. It is also important for forming cell membranes, the specialised layers that enclose body cells. It is a principal mineral of bones and teeth, it is part of every cell, it is important in genetic material, part of phospholipids and used in energy transfer and in buffer systems that maintain acid-base balance.
 

Dietary sources of phosphorus


Phosphorus is found in most foods because it is a critical component of all living organisms. Protein-rich foods, such as meat, poultry, fish, eggs, dairy products, nuts, and legumes are particularly good sources of phosphorus. Beside high­protein foods, phosphorus is also found in decreasing quantities in whole grain breads and cereals, especially unprocessed ones, and in minute amounts in fruits and vegetables. Phosphorus supplements are also available as dibasic potassium phosphate, dibasic sodium phosphate, monobasic potassium phosphate, monobasic sodium phosphate, and tribasic sodium phosphate.
 

Phosphorus deficiency


Inadequate phosphorus intake results in abnormally low serum phosphate levels (hypophosphatemia). Hypophosphatemia is usually asymptomatic. Chronic severe hypophosphatemia can cause anorexia, muscle weakness, and osteomalacia. Phosphorous deficiencies can be caused by excessive intake of aluminum containing agents (such as certain antacids) because the aluminum can bind to phosphorous. In addition, diabetes, starvation, alcoholism, and conditions that can cause abnormal absorption of nutrients can lead to depletion of phosphorous in the body. Symptoms of phosphate deficiency include loss of appetite, anxiety, bone pain, bone fragility, stiffness in the joints, fatigue, irregular breathing, irritability, numbness, weakness, and weight change. In children, decreased growth and poor bone and tooth development may occur.

 

Dosage, intake, recommended daily allowance (RDA)


The recommended daily allowance for phosphorous is 700 mg daily. Women who are pregnant and breastfeeding require an additional 200mg per day. For children 3 to 8 years of age, the RDA is 450 - 500 mg. However, phosphorous deficency is rare in healthy people. There's no need to take phosphorous supplements for most of them.

 

Side effects, precautions, toxicity, and drug interactions


The common side effect with use of sodium or potassium phosphate is diarrhea. The most serious adverse effect of abnormally elevated blood levels of phosphate (hyperphosphatemia) is the calcification of non-skeletal tissues, most commonly the kidneys. Too much phosphate can lead to diarrhea and calcification (hardening) of organs and soft tissue, and can interfere with the body's ability to use iron, calcium, magnesium, and zinc. Too much phosphorus can also result in dangerous imbalances of other vital nutrients. Excessive amounts of phosphorus can interfere with calcium uptake. High doses of insulin may decrease blood levels of phosphorus in people with diabetic ketoacidosis. People with severe kidney disease must avoid excessive phosphorus. White phosphorus is a highly toxic, flammable substance capable of burning the skin if it makes contact, and of igniting at room temperature.